25 Years a Bible Software Developer

In 1994, just after I got married, I started working on a DOS program for doing Bible searches. Yesterday, I released version 8.3 of this same program.

Of course, the original code I wrote in 1994 isn’t actually being used any more, but what originally was known as Bible Assistant was consistently re-worked and improved to eventually become the mature application today known as SwordSearcher.

Here’s a picture of me holding up the very first order form I ever received for my Bible software.

Me, holding the very first order for my Bible software.

The order form is dated December 26, 1994. (I’m outside in a short sleeve shirt because I was living in Hawaii.)

At the time this photo was taken, my “real job” was digging ditches and working on septic systems. I didn’t know it back then, but my real job was really writing Bible software.

It took me another seven years to get to the point where I would no longer need to hold down side-jobs to pay the bills. In the early 2000s, I quit my job at RadioShack, where I helped customers find batteries and resistors for five years.

Since then I have spent most of the working hours of my days developing my own Bible software and working as an independent contractor on other people’s projects.

It only dawned on me last night, as I wrote up an announcement for version 8.3 of SwordSearcher, that I had been doing this for 25 years. What tremendous grace of God I have been shown – to be able to work on technology for studying the Bible for nearly my entire adult life!

I’m Color Blind. It’s no cure, but Enchroma glasses do work!

I hated learning colors when I was a kid. Green traffic lights look white. I’ve painted the sky purple more than once in art class.

I’m a moderate deutan — meaning I have a form of red-green color perception deficiency. You can see what it looks like here.

Enchroma sells glasses that are supposed to help a color blind person see more colors. To say I was skeptical when I first heard about it would be an understatement. Well, now I have a pair, and see for yourself my reaction.

Triple-monitor wallpaper pack 1 (5760×1200)

Modern versions of Windows (and probably other OSes too) let you span your desktop wallpaper across all monitors. I use a three-monitor setup with 16×10 monitors and had a hard time finding wallpapers that I liked that were optimal for this configuration.

So, using Apophysis 7x and Photoshop, I whipped up a bunch suited to my tastes. I figured I’d share. These are optimized for three monitors of 1920×1200 resolution each, or 5760×1200. And sure, you could use this for two monitors, too.

Rather than post the full size images to my blog, I’ll include thumbnails (are 500 pixel wide images thumbnails?) below, and you can download the whole pack in a zip file:

Brandon’s-Triple-Monitor-Wallpaper-Pack-1.zip (27.4 MB)

(Tip: if you use these, be sure to set the wallpaper mode to span, not “center ” or “fill” or anything else. These are meant to give one large image across all monitors, not three duplicate images!)

And here are the 13 wallpapers in this pack:

Apo7X-150325-31-b Apo7X-150325-664 Apo7X-150325-678 Apo7X-150325-678b Apo7X-150325-730 Apo7X-150325-771 Apo7X-150325-928 Apo7X-150325-946 Apo7X-150325-2005 Apo7X-150325-2053 Apo7X-150325-2073 Apo7X-cApo7X-150325-31

Again, I didn’t want to post the full images individually to my blog. Download the whole pack: Brandon’s-Triple-Monitor-Wallpaper-Pack-1.zip (27.4 MB)

Thoughts on getting things done

A disorganized life is full of broken windows.

There is a theory in criminology called Broken Windows Theory. The idea goes like this: If a building has broken windows that go un-repaired for a length of time, chances are that vandals will break more of the windows. Later, they may break into the building or set it on fire.

Ge in control with a to-do list.

You might think you lack control of your daily life because you have too much work to do. But, as with so many things, perception is not always reality.

We perceive that we have too many tasks to complete because we don’t actually know how many tasks we have to complete. This perception of being overwhelmed with work feeds on itself, compounding the problem.